Best High Court Lawyers in Bangalore

Finding the right High Court lawyers in Bangalore with high qualification and vast experience in the field of Law canhigh court lawyers in bangalore be a tough job. We at Alliance Law Associates, Bangalore have the best Advocates in town who can handle all your legal disputes and claims. We have a team of Criminal lawyers, Divorce Lawyers and Civil Lawyers at your disposal.

Lawyer Advocateor  is a general term for a person who gives legal device and aid and who conducts suits in court. An attorney or, more correctly, an attorney-at-law, is a member of the legal profession who represents a client in court when pleading or defending a case.

At Alliance Law Associates you can find the best High Court Lawyers in Bangalore who is capable of conducting suits in court with ease and grace.

Here’s a brief history about the High Court of Karnataka.

After the death of Tippu Sultan in 1799, the British recognized the claim of Krishnaraja Wodeyar III, son of Chamaraja Wodeyar to the throne of the State. Poornaiah continued to be the Diwan and Barry Close was the Resident.

The State was divided into three ‘Subhas’ each under the control of a Subhedar, who was the executive officer and also the Judge in his domain. ‘Subhas’ were divided into Districts and the latter into Taluks.

On October 21, 1831 the Governor-General of India Bentick issued proclamation and assumed administration of Mysore for East India Company on the allegation that Raja was incapable of handling the affairs of the State. Administration of Mysore was entrusted to a Board of Commissioners which included a Senior Commissioner and a Junior Commissioner. This Board was assisted by Diwan in financial matters and the Resident in political relations of the Ruler. This Board was abolished in June 1832 and administration of the State was entrusted to one single Commissioner.

After the death of Krishnaraja Wodeyar III in 1868, the British restored the throne to his adopted son Chamarajendra Wodeyar only in March 1881.

In 1881 the post of the Commissioner was abolished and British Resident was appointed in at Mysore. A post of Diwan was created and he was to be the head of the administrative machinery with a council of two advisors.

The above system of administration continued till the Maharaja executed the instrument of accession to the Dominion of India on 24-9-1947.

Under the Constitution of India, Mysore State was Part ‘B’ State with the Maharaja designated as the ‘RAJPRAMUKH’.

EARLY COURTS :

Under Hyder Ali and Tippu Sultan, administration of Justice was mainly a local concern. Revenue Officers also acted as Judges. It was the duty of the Amils to investigate serious criminal cases and report to higher authorities for decision. There was a Sadar (Chief) Court at the Capital for administering justice in accordance with Mohammadan Law. Qazis in important towns decided matters concerning succession, inheritance and other matters as per the provisions of Mohammadan Law.

During the regime of Diwan Poornaiah and thereafter, due regard was paid to age old institutions and doctrines of Hindu Law. Matters were usually determined according to earlier precedents and practices. Administration of civil justice was conducted in a manner analogous to that of criminal justice. Separate Department of Justice was constituted at Mysore. It consisted of two Bakshis as Judges, two Sheristedars, six respectable persons who constituted a Standing Panchayet, with one Qazi and one Pandit. In this Court, both civil and criminal cases were heard. Matters relating to caste or community were referred for decision to Pandit or Qazi, as the case may be, who were aided by Panchayet. In taluks also, the disputes were settled through the Panchayet either nominated by the parties or constituted by the Taluk authorities. When life or liberty of a prisoner was involved, the case was fixed for final hearing before the Diwan who pronounced his decision in consultation with the Resident. Death penalty was inflicted only in cases of murder or plunder. Theft or robbery was punished with imprisonment and hard labour in pRoportion to the nature of crimes. In cases where traditional laws and customs were not applicable, the courts were to act according to the justice, equity and good conscience.

In the beginning of the 18th century, after the Maharaja assumed the reins of the Government, he established a new Sadar Court presided over by two Bakshis to decide civil suits of the value of more than Rs.500/-. Below the Sadar Court, there were three inferior courts, each presided over by two Presidents called Hakims. The two inferior courts were empowered to decide Civil suits, one court up to the value of Rs. 100/- and another court from Rs. 100/- to Rs. 500/-. The third inferior court had exclusive powers to try criminal cases, such as assault, robbery and minor offences and submit proceedings to the Bakshis of the Sadar Court to impose punishment. In respect of heinous crimes, the Bakshis would submit a report to His Highness the Maharaja and get his orders for awarding sentence.

In 1834, the entire State was divided into four divisions viz., Bangalore, Nagar, Chitaldurg and Ashtagram. Each division was represented by an European Officer designated as the Superintendent. He was vested with judicial powers in addition to his duties of collection of revenue. You can read more about the High Court of Karnataka here.

High Court Lawyers in Bangalore
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